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Fo Shou, Qi Lan, Ban Tian Yao, Wu Yi Zhong, Ai Jiao Wu Long
Jin Guan Yin, Huang Guan Yin, Jin Mu Dan

Newer tea plant breedings for Oolong, grown in different places.
  • Fo Shou (“Buddha’s Hand”) or Xiang Yuan (“Lemon”). The name comes from a citrus fruit of which the plant smells like. This citrus fruit looks like a huge hand with many fingers. It is cultivated in China and in Taiwan. It is crafted in Fujian Province in the style of the Anxi Oolong in Yongchun, in Wuyishan like an Wuyi Rock Tea; in Shiding, Taiwan, like a green rolled-leaf Oolong, or as a roasted Bao Zhong.
  • Qi Lan (“Special Orchid”) or Bai Ya Qi Lan (“White Bud Special Orchid”) is cultivated in Taiwan; in Pinghe, Fujian; and in Wuyishan, Fujian, either as a rolled leaf Oolong or as a Wuyi Rock Tea.
  • Ban Tian Yao (Spirit Halfway to Heaven) once were wild tea plants growing on inaccessible rock slopes in Wuyishan which have been reproduced by cuttings.
  • Wu Yi Zhong originates from Wuyishan and has been introduced in Taiwan by Chinese migrants from the mainland some when between 1850 and 1900. It was mostly planted in Mingjain, where it has become rare. It is currently not clear, if this variety still exists in Wuyishan, or if it is known as another varietal.
  • Ai Jiao Wu Long (little foot oolong) is a local variety with rather small leaves that is originally from Jian'ou (to the south of Wuyishan). It is grown in Wuyishan and used for Wuyi Rock tea.
  • Jin Guan Yin (Golden Buddha of compassion) is the result of a crossing of Tie Guan Yin and Huang Dan. It is grown in Anxi, Wuyishan and some other regions of Fujian. The leaves of this variety is made into ball-shaped Oolongs and Wuyi Rock Tea and, since recently, black tea is made from it. The variety has been bred by the institute for agricultural science of Fujian Province from 1978 to 1999.
  • Huang Guan Yin (Yellow Buddha of compassion) is a crossing of Tie Guan Yin and Huang Dan. This varietal has been released by the institute for agricultural science of Fujian Province in 1998.
  • Jin Mu Dan (Golden Peony) is another crossing of Tie Guan Yin and Huang Dan, and is chiefly used for Oolong and black tea. The variety has been bred by the institute for agricultural science of Fujian Province from 1978 to 2002.