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Jin Xuan, Cui Yu, Hong Yu, Si Ji Chun, Qing Xin Gan Zhong, Huang Gan, Da Man Zhong

These are either newly bred Taiwanese varieties gathered under the name of Tai Cha X Hao ("Taiwan Tea Varietal No. X)" or other Taiwanese tea varietals.
  • Jin Xuan ("Golden Day Liliy") (Tai Cha 12 Hao or 2027) is used for various Oolong teas, and is grown at up to 1600m above sea level. It also grows well on higher altitudes, but the resutling tea is not so good, hence it is not planted at higher altitudes. It was developed during the Japanese occupation and it was named (and introduced?) in 1981. It's a cross-breed of Ying Zhi Hong Xin (which in Shimen was used to produce black tea) and Tai Nong 8 Hao (a variety developed during the Japanese occupation). Jinxuan was the name of the developer's grand-mother.
  • Cui Yu ("Green Jade") (Tai Cha 13 Hao 0r 2029) is used for various Oolong teas and grows at an altitude of up to 1000m o.s.l. It was named (and introduced) in 1981. This variety is a cross-breed of Tai Nong 80 Hao (a variety developed during the Japanese occupation) and (Ying Zhi Hong Xin (which in Shimen was used to produce black tea). Cuiyu was the name of the mother of the developer. This variety is grown at up to 1000m above sea level. It also grows well on higher altitudes, but the resutling tea is not so good, hence it is not planted at higher altitudes.
  • Hong Yu (Red Jade) (Tai Cha 18 Hao), for black tea fom Yuch that goe sby the name of Hong Yu Hong Cha. It is a cross-breed of a taiwanese and a burmese variety and ii's grown in the region of the Sun Moon lake since 1999, following a strong earthquake. Nowadays, this variety is also grown in Mingjian and possibly in other places as well.
  • Hong Yun (Red charm) (Tai Cha 21Hao) is used for black tea. It is a more recent breed (2008) resutling from the crossing of a small-leaf variety from Qimen (China, province of Anhui) and a large-leaf variety from India.
  • Si Ji Chun ("Four Seasons Spring") does not have a "Tai Cha No. X" denomination, as it is not a cross-breed. It was discovered by a tea producerin Muzha and from there it has been brought to Mingjian. Nowadays, it is the most commonly grown variety for Oolong. It can be harvested up to 6 times a yeas. In the cold months, the tea is very good, but in the hot monhs, the tea is tart and bitter; it is then used to make ice tea.
  • Qing Xin Gan Zhong ("Green Heart Sweet Varietal") is an old variety, that is mostly grown in Sanxia on Taiwan. Originally, the variety was used for Oolong Tea (particularly FAncy Oolong resp. Oriental Beauty), but nowadays mostly green teas (Taiwan Bi Luo Chun and Taiwan Long Jing), but also white teas (Bi Luo Bai Cha and Bi Luo Hong Cha, Mi Xiang Hong Cha) are made from this variety.
  • Huang Gan Zhong ("Yellow Sweet Varietal") is an old variety, that used to be very popular in Taiwan, particularly for tea destined for export. This variety is often confused with Qing Xin Gan Zhong.
  • Da Man Zhong ("Large Slow Varietal") is a varietal that grows very slowly, thus developing intense aroma. It is exclusively used for Oriental Beauty in Shiding and Pinglin, both Xinbei, Taiwan.